PHOEBE CUMMINGS 'SUPERNATURAL'

30/6 - 29/7

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EXHIBITION INTRODUCTION


Looking to ancient plants with magical associations, as well as those presently endangered or extinct, this new body of work considers what we might carry forward into the future, as a ritual costume and totems for the Anthropocene. The fragile pieces are carefully wrought by hand in clay, sometimes preserved with wax; it is significant that their survival demands care and attention. The work draws together a sense of 'English Paganism' as well as the excess of Baroque and Rococo design, resulting in objects that might be considered dystopian ornaments of a future anthropology. The work builds on an ongoing interest in time and nature and how this has been represented and stylised through design. The objects take the position of something more than natural: they are supernatural.

In contrast to previous transient objects and installations, this new body of work considers the present moment as a site for sculpture, where the objects may outlive the moment to which they are connected.


Phoebe Cummings, 2017
 

 
 


SLIDESHOW OF EXHIBITION IMAGES
 

 
 
 
 


ARTIST INTERVIEW FILM & VIDEO TOUR

 
 

 
 


BIOGRAPHY
 

Phoebe Cummings is a British artist born in Walsall, England in 1981. She currently resides in Stoke-on-Trent. 

Cummings sculptural work builds on an ongoing interest in time and nature and how this has been represented and stylised through design. She works predominantly using unfired clay to make poetic and performative sculptures and installations that emphasize materiality, fragility, time, creation and decay. Cummings' impressive interventions are constructed directly on site, allowing an instinctive development of tensions between object and location. In her current work, Cummings' practice has developed to exist beyond the duration of the exhibition. Cummings questions what we will carry forward into the future by producing intricate, hand made and exquisitely delicate sculptures based on ancient plants and primitive ritual, imbued with a sense of magic and mysticism. Drawing together elements of English Paganism as well as the aesthetic excess of Baroque and Rococo design, the resultant objects could be considered as dystopian ornaments of a future anthropology. 
 
Phoebe Cummings studied ceramics at Brighton University in 2002 before completing an MA in ceramics and glass at the Royal College of Art in 2005. She has undertaken a number of artist residencies in the UK, USA and Greenland, including a six month residency at the Victoria & Albert Museum in 2010. In 2017 she won first place at the inaugural Woman’s Hour Craft Prize with work exhibited at the V&A Museum, before touring to venues around the UK. Cummings was selected as the winner of the British Ceramics Biennial Award in 2011 and awarded a ceramics fellowship at London’s Camden Arts Centre (2012–13). ‘Supernatural’ was her first solo exhibition at Anima-Mundi. In addition, Cummings’ work has been featured in numerous group exhibitions, including '60|40 Starting Point Series’ at Siobhan Davies Studios, London, 'Formed Thoughts' at Jerwood Space, London; and 'Swept Away: Dust, Ashes, and Dirt in Contemporary Art and Design' at the Museum of Arts and Design, New York. In 2013, she had a solo show at the University of Hawaii Art Gallery in Honolulu and The exchange in Penzance. Phoebe Cummings is represented by Anima-Mundi.
 

 
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